Board BBS

    • Black HS CA cheerleaders take a knee, while players stand,
      Those feral Negroes could emphasize that kneeling by refusing ALL hand-outs from the taxpayers.

      Do not accept any quotas giving extra points applied to hiring by being a fucking Negro beast.

      Fucking kneeing Negro filth want it all.

      Akin to the fucking feminist cunts who want all the damn rights and privileges but tuen their fucking pig noses up at equal responsibilities.

      [continued]
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    • fauxmotes
      OCD. Sure.

      What's the real reason behind calling certain things "OCD" while at the same time letting leftists, pervs, hasbarats, and other freaks indulge in true OCD behavior - as in calculated OCD behavior. Calculated and rooted in the silly hope that they can influence someone's views when it comes to politics and certain social situations. :lol:
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    • > 12/05/2017 12:08 AM : .
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    • The reason I hate dots goes back 40 years to Mizzou(long)
      [quote]..[/quote]

      Those nose hairs of yours, Loafy, look like they might get stuck between your teefers, and the straps, and cause chin seizures.

      We will talk to Hams in the morning about having this fomote banned from your bedside table.

      But until then, Nurse Ratchett has a leetle nighttime candy for you.

      [continued]
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    • A(ll)C(ock)D(evouring) just hid my owning post, here it is
      [quote]..[/quote]

      I supported Bernie, even though Socialism doesn't work in culturally diverse countries. I voted for Green Dr. Jill Stein, cus knew Trump would win my state without my help.

      The Guardian, Nation, Mother Jones, New Republic all told to shut up when started criticizing Bill from the left. Mention of Mena or Whitewater just disappeared. Hillary was his henchwoman with trashing his rape victims.

      There is a lot I don't like about Donald, but the tyrants of this world did not respect Obama. Hillary would have been a left-wing version of Maggie Thatcher, despised and reviled, proving she had a dick with random acts of aggression.
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    • Any of you Chicago tards going to see Gary Numan tonight at Thalia Hall?
      No, actually he's both. You've been had, gayboy.

      http://www.earshot-online.com/reviews/DisplayReview.cfm?DiscID=10309&CFID=4735&CFTOKEN=E62B36AF-857D-4351-90D46A1EBA9D19F0

      was just turning 14 when Ric Ocasek and Greg Hawkes of The Cars stopped by a young Toronto rock station and had free reign of the airwaves for a couple of hours. (As you can guess, those were different times.) They played a bunch of new punk and electronic singles, unheard slabs of synthesized pop, drone and desperate pulse by the likes of Suicide, The Normal and a very British little concern called Tubeway Army. Immediately, a whole new world of shared unease opened up for me. Most striking was the flat affect of Tubeway Army's "Praying to the Aliens" -- it wasn't sci-fi; it was essentially about submitting to a society in which one didn't feel a rightful place -- and the next day, I went to the mall with my mom and bought the album, Replicas, from which it came. The album (reissued a few years ago on CD by Beggar's Banquet with extra tracks) featured a bleached-out loner named Gary Numan unveiling a clockwork trove of electro-missives from the sunken heart. "Me! I Disconnect from You", "Down in the Park" and, especially, "Are 'Friends' Electric?" were plaintive cries from a solitary figure cornered by the suspicion and mistrust engendered by the approaching conservatism of the futurist 1980s. When he started, Gary Numan was an openly gay man adrift in a horribly straight world. But his songs made sense to anyone who felt ostracized and frighteningly alone. By the end of the year, though, Numan lost course in the cold simplisms of "Cars", and he rode out the new decade as a one-hit wonder readymade for the remainder bins. Twenty-four years later, The Cars are part of the classic rock soundtrack looping at that same Toronto station, Gary Numan has taken a (female) partner and fathered a daughter, and a new wave of club mixers has come calling. Hybrid, a two-CD sprawl inspired by fan and executive producer Steve Malins, is a bottom-up revision of Numan old and new. Flood, Andy Gray and Alan Moulder stretch, distort and push lingering sentiments into new forms. If the brand-new songs ("Ancients", "Hybrid", "Crazier") seem dispiritingly 1995, the overhauls of material ranging from 1978's "Everyday I Die" to 2000's "Listen to My Voice" breathe an even more human warmth into the chill. Most delightfully, the standouts are revisits to Replicas: "Down in the Park" has an even gloomier resonance in its two reworkings (by the Curve and Monti); "Are 'Friends' Electric?" is the echo of a lost soul still trying to find a way out. The stark topper is Moulder's wobbly, shredding take on "Me! I Disconnect from You". "I could feel his mind decaying/Only inches away from me/And I disconnect from you" Numan intones, and the fear of 1979 becomes the all-too-true loss of 2003. This is stark reality, not a sentimental journey.
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    • Test to detect if the shortcut stuff works here
      I hereby and forthwith from now until the rivers no longer run and the grass does not grow bestow upon the exemplary Hans Unit the official lusted-for-by-all the notorious USMC GRUNTLED REGIMENT AWARD. Bear and wear it proudly ye who is now Sir Hans.
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